Close Menu
Ron Aslam Law Office
Available 24/7 | Free Initial Consultation

FAQs

General

Do I have to hire you before we can meet to discuss my case?

Absolutely not. The Ron Aslam Law Office offers all potential clients a free consultation in which you and Ron can briefly discuss your criminal law matter or the merits of your personal injury issue. There is no commitment to retain Ron as your attorney, but, should you decide to retain him, you and he will then work together to resolve your matter based on the fee arrangement discussed at the free consultation.

What should I bring to the free consultation?

To make the most of your free consultation, you are advised to bring all documentation relating to your matter. If you have been arrested or are under criminal investigation, bring any paper or electronic documents you have relating to the matter, including court documents, tickets, notifications, and correspondence. If you are pursuing a personal injury matter, bring any documents relating to the injury and any relevant correspondence between you and any potential defendants and/or insurers.

Criminal Defense

Won’t talking to a lawyer make me look I’m guilty?

No. The state and federal criminal laws that affect your case can be very complex, and the average layperson is unaware of their rights and how to go about defending them. Innocent people are charged with crimes all the time and even go to jail for them. Retaining a lawyer to represent you and defend your rights is a much safer and smarter strategy than going it alone, even at the early stages of an investigation. You have nothing to gain by waiving your right to speak with a lawyer, and everything to lose.

When do I have a right to be represented by a lawyer?

You have a right to be represented by a lawyer at any and all points in the criminal investigation process. You are never required to incriminate yourself to a law enforcement officer, and, if you are being interrogated by law enforcement and request a lawyer, then all questioning must stop until you obtain the services of a lawyer.

What are my Miranda rights?

The Supreme Court has held that, for any statements to be admissible against you in court, law enforcement officers must advise you of your “Miranda” rights if you are the subject of a “custodial interrogation.” This means that an officer must advise you that you have the right to remain silent, that anything you say can be used against you in court, that you have the right to consult with an attorney and have the attorney present during questioning, and that, if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided to you. It is important to remember, however, that you have these rights at all times, regardless of when or whether the officer reads you the rights. Thus, you can always and should always request to speak with a lawyer and avoid talking to the police without your lawyer present.

Personal Injury

Will I be responsible for legal fees if I don’t win my case?

No. You only pay legal fees if we win. The Ron Aslam Law Office accepts personal injury matters on a contingency basis, which means that your legal fee will be a percentage of whatever recovery you obtain either at trial or in settlement negotiations. If you do not recover, you will owe no legal fee.

How much will I recover if I bring a personal injury lawsuit?

For most negligence cases in Kentucky, an injured plaintiff is entitled to damages for all past, present, and future medical bills, any days missed from work, losses to future earning capacity, pain and suffering, and, in some cases, punitive damages. Calculating these numbers, especially involving future costs, can be challenging, and proving them to a jury can be tougher still. Ultimately, a jury will decide what damages a plaintiff is owed, and a judge may lower this number. Oftentimes, injured plaintiffs will negotiate a settlement with a defendant to avoid the uncertainty and cost of trial. We will work with you to obtain as high an award or settlement as possible, while factoring in the risk and reward of proceeding to trial.

Share This Page: